sports photography

MindShift Moose Pack MP-3 v2 field-tested: A winner for wildlife and action shooters

Moose Peterson MP-3 V2.0It’s no secret that I loved my original MP-3, and made it my “go to” camera bag when I had to bring my wildlife photo gear somewhere and needed to make efficient use of space – particularly for trips involving small planes or a bit of hiking. So it was great news for me when Moose Peterson teamed up with Think Tank’s MindShift brand to produce a new, improved, version. I’ve been using it for a while now, and am very impressed. It retains the flexible design of the original, but offers improved shoulder straps, an even more-rugged build quality, and a few other nice touches.

Upgraded Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 and new Nikon PC 19mm lenses announced

Photo of  AF-S NIKKOR<br/> 70-200mm f/2.8E FL ED VRThe Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 lens (in all its incarnations) may be one of the most popular pro lenses ever. Now, Nikon has improved on an already great lens with the new . It features a closer MFD (Minimum Focusing Distance), new coatings for yet lower distortion, improved VR, all at about the same size and weight (actually a touch lighter according to the specs). The only downside is the by now familiar price increase. The current is selling for about $2100, while the .

New Sony RX10 III field-tested: The ultimate all-in-one Superzoom is now even better

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 III Digital CameraNo one like carrying a lot of camera gear, or changing lenses. But for many of us it is a necessary evil to get the shots we want. But the question I get asked most is "I want a camera that does it all, but I don't want to carry several lenses or a big backpack or tripod, what should I buy?" The new is an excellent answer. With a 1-inch-format 20MP sensor, and a 24-600mm super-zoom lens from Zeiss, it takes remarkably good images for an all-in-one camera, and it does it across a massive focal length range. The big upgrade from the Mark II is an increase in zoom range from 200mm to 600mm at the long end (resulting in a slightly larger, and more-expensive, camera).

Hands-on with the Nikon D5 and Nikon D500: Amazing new DSLRs from Nikon

I got to shoot with both the new and at CES, and they are each amazing in their own way. For no-holds-barred shooting performance the ’s 14fps (12fps for up to 200 frames of RAW) and borderline-insane 3,000,000 ISO capability can’t be beat. But at over $6K and 3 pounds, with “only” 21MP of resolution, it certainly won’t be for everyone. It’s certainly the camera of choice for big-budget (and big backpack) wildlife and sports photographers, along with photojournalists who can deal with the size in exchange for unheard of low-light performance.