Camera Body

Living with the Nikon D850: Should you upgrade from your Nikon D810?

I’ve had a Nikon D850 for a few weeks now, and been able to use it in a variety of situations, and with a variety of lenses. For the TL;DR crowd the short answer is that it’s an amazing camera and produces great images. In my case, I’m very happy to have upgraded from my (which I sold to recover about 1/2 the cost of the D850), although that upgrade isn’t for everyone, so let’s discusses the pros and cons.

 

Nikon D850 Announced, Available for Pre-order: Might be the best DSLR ever?

The Nikon D850 is official. It may be the very best DSLR ever built. The $3300 price tag is a really-good deal given all the features it packs, including 45+MP, 7/9 fps, 4K video, 8K timelapse, focus peaking, and lots more:  .

Nikon D7500 field tested: A winner DSLR for mid-range budgets

Nikon D7500 DSLR Camera (Body Only)Like almost every pro Nikon shooter, I’m eagerly awaiting the new Nikon D850. In the meantime, I needed an updated backup camera for my . I wanted one good enough to use for “pro” work, but small and light enough that I could easily carry it in a messenger bag with my drone for field work. I’d already shot with the Nikon D500 and , which are both excellent cameras, but decided to be a little more adventurous and purchase the newer , that fits many of the features of the into a smaller, less-expensive, package.

Sony's new monster full-frame Alpha a9 mirrorless available for pre-order

If you aren’t hopelessly addicted to Nikon or Canon, and don’t need the massive array of lenses and accessories they offer, then Sony is giving you one more big reason to dump your DSLR and go mirrorless. The is a spectacular performance machine, capable of 20fps shooting with Autofocus, for example. I’ll be writing more about it (and perhaps giving one a field test) in the coming weeks and months, but wanted to make sure eager beavers got in on the first pre-orders. You can put your order in for a – with shipments expected to start May 25th.

Fujifilm X-Pro2: Retro camera for those with Leica envy

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital Camera (Body Only)Right from the first look the screams retro, and reminds one of a Leica. Its square-shaped, solid-metal, body, with large control dials on top is a definite throwback. At first blush, so is the Rangefinder (which under the hood turns out to be a lot more than that). As with Leica, a carefully-curated selection of high-performance lenses complement the camera itself. The design may be retro, and a few of the features, but the Fuji X-Pro 2 packs a punch when it comes to the latest technology, features, and premium image quality. You won't be sacrificing anything in those areas by moving to one.

Lumix ZS100: A Goldilocks camera for image lovers who need more zoom from their point and shoot

Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS100 Digital Camera (Black)A common theme in compact cameras is the tradeoff between zoom range and image quality. The very top rated () has the best image quality, but a small zoom range of 24-70mm. The () stretches that to 24-100mm, but that’s not much of a gain. On the other extreme, the () provides both an amazing zoom and great image quality, but is much larger and more expensive. Enter the . It is larger than the RX100 or Canon G series, but not by a huge amount. In exchange it offers a larger, 25-250mm, zoom range but doesn’t trade off much in image quality.

Nikon announces impressive Nikon KeyMission Action Camera lineup

KeyMissionAfter teasing us at CES with impressive 360-degree 4K video from its action camera prototypes, Nikon has finally announced the details of the three models in its KeyMission family of action cameras. Unlike Nikon’s under-performing entries in the mirrorless market, that never took off, the KeyMission cameras are designed to deliver state-of-the-art performance at very reasonable prices – pitting them squarely against the slow-to-ship Samsung Gear 360 and the incumbent line of GoPros, now updated with the new Hero 5.

Canon EOS M5: Finally, Canon gets serious about mirrorless

Canon EOS M5 Mirrorless Digital Camera (Body Only)Both Nikon and Canon have been late to the game, and half-hearted, in their attempts to enter the mirrorless market – content up until now to protect their DSLR offerings. However, the writing is on the wall, and with the advent of phase-detect pixels and high-resolution EVFs, mirrorless is poised to take over even more of the traditional DSLR market. With the Canon seems to have finally decided to produce a state-of-the-art mirrorless offering, able to go head to head with its own DSLRs. A 24MP APS-C model, capable of 9 fps, and sporting a 2.36MP EVF and dual pixel AF, it will be worth considering for anyone not completely addicted to an optical viewfinder.

Canon pushes DSLR performance further with new Canon 5D Mark IV

In a major upgrade to its “mid-size” pro DSLR, Canon has pushed DSLR performance further with its new . The 30.4MP full-frame camera can shoot at 7 fps for up to 21 frames in RAW, and an unlimited number when recording JPEG. 61 AF points should give it excellent Autofocus performance. The addition of 4K video @ 30 fps (up to 30 minute clips) is also a nice, modernizing, feature. Startup time is an impressive .1 seconds, with a 58 millisecond shutter lag. At 1.76 pounds, it fits squarely into the “mid-range” of pro DSLRs, a popular category for those who don’t want to carry (or pay for) the 3 pound monster flagship models.

The power of the comes at a price. You can pre-order one for $4,600 from B&H, with the cameras expected to start shipping on September 8th.

Nikon unleashes new entry-level D3400 and lenses for serious shooters on a budget

If you’ve been considering giving up on DSLRs and shifting to a smaller, possibly-lower-cost mirrorless camera, Nikon wants to make you think again. The new builds on the image quality of Nikon’s DSLRs and adds some intriguing usability features – like SnapBridge which should make image sharing with your mobile device much easier. At 5 fps, it should have enough performance for most. And you can get it in a kit with Nikon’s new 18-55mm VR lens for $650 when it ships in September.

Nikon D500 field-tested: Long-expected successor to the Nikon D300 worth the wait!

Nikon D500 DSLR Camera (Body Only)Few cameras have had a more loyal following than the Nikon D300 (and predecessor Nikon D200). For those who wanted a pro-quality Nikon without moving to the size and expense of full-frame, they represented an excellent combination of features at a reasonable price. However, as the years have gone by, the tech in those cameras has been left in the dust. Many owners have been forced to move either “down” to a more consumer-oriented, but newer, model like the , or up to a larger, more-expensive, model like the . No longer. I shot almost exclusively in Alaska for two weeks with a , and loved it. It is easy to hold, fun to use, and took photos that are as high quality as I’ve ever seen from a 21MP sensor.

Canon G9 X field-tested: Best camera you can easily fit in a pocket

Canon PowerShot G9 X Digital Camera (Silver)The appeal of a camera you can always have with you is obvious. For an increasing number of people that’s their smartphone. But if you want to have something with a bigger sensor and a zoom lens, a compact point-and-shoot is the way to go. That creates something of a Goldilocks problem – the cheap, small ones aren’t much better than a phone, and the high-end ones don’t fit in a pocket. Canon has done a good job over the years with its S series in finding a middle ground – reasonable sensor, good features, and Raw capability. I’ve been shooting with the newest version, rebranded as the , and have been impressed by the upgrade in image quality, while learning to like, or at least live with, the new Touchscreen-centric interface…

New Sony RX10 III field-tested: The ultimate all-in-one Superzoom is now even better

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX10 III Digital CameraNo one like carrying a lot of camera gear, or changing lenses. But for many of us it is a necessary evil to get the shots we want. But the question I get asked most is "I want a camera that does it all, but I don't want to carry several lenses or a big backpack or tripod, what should I buy?" The new is an excellent answer. With a 1-inch-format 20MP sensor, and a 24-600mm super-zoom lens from Zeiss, it takes remarkably good images for an all-in-one camera, and it does it across a massive focal length range. The big upgrade from the Mark II is an increase in zoom range from 200mm to 600mm at the long end (resulting in a slightly larger, and more-expensive, camera).

Sony a6300 compact mirrorless field tested: Amazing tech in a small package

I've spent a lot more time shooting with the new since my first look article, and the experience has reinforced my impressions -- both pro and con. On the pro side, the speed and image quality is really amazing. I covered multiple events at Nvidia's tech conference, in a variety of awful lighting conditions, and the camera performed flawlessly at ISOs up to 3200 (where I had Auto ISO set to top out). However, even after some customization of the interface, I found the controls inefficient, especially in dark rooms.

Sony a6300: A nearly perfect camera if you can live with the controls

Sony Alpha a6300 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 16-50mm LensAlmost every photographer I know wishes their camera was smaller and lighter. But of course they don’t want to give up speed or features. This is particularly true with those of us clinging to our DSLRs, but constantly eyeing the mirrorless category for new models, as they creep up on our larger cameras in capability. With the launch of its , yet another set of barriers to moving to mirrorless have come down. I’ve been shooting with one since its launch and while I’ll be doing a more-detailed review, I wanted to get my preliminary thoughts out.

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